Open Systems Laboratory at Illinois

Research Theme

The goal of the Illinois Open Systems Laboratory is to develop mechanisms to simplify the development of scalable parallel, distributed and mobile computing systems. Such systems are open to interactions with their environment, must satisfy real-time constraints, and often affect physical processes. The approach of the laboratory is multidisciplinary—is conducted in foundational models of concurrency, programming languages, and middleware.

Research in the laboratory is based on the actor model of concurrent computation. Actors are inherently autonomous computational objects which interact with each other by sending messages. Each actor has a unique name the activity of different actors is potentially parallel. Actor systems are highly dynamic: new actors may be created and names of actors exchanged. The model is very general: processes, sensors and actuators can be modelled as actors.

Over the last decade, research in the group has developed a meta-architectural model for middleware. The model has been formalized and applied to dependable computing and software architecture. Programming abstractions have been developed to represent coordination constraints real-time and requirements. The Actor model has been extended to explicitly model mobility and bounded resources, thus providing a powerful formalism for mobile agents.

Latest Publications

  1. Minas Charalambides, Peter Dinges, and Gul Agha. Parameterized, concurrent session types for asynchronous multi-actor interactions. Science of Computer Programming, November 2015.
  2. Peter Dinges and Gul Agha. Targeted test input generation using symbolic-concrete backward execution. In 29th IEEE/ACM International Conference on Automated Software Engineering (ASE). Västerås, Sweden, September 15-19 2014. ACM.
  3. Peter Dinges and Gul Agha. Targeted test input generation using symbolic-concrete backward execution. Technical Report, University of Illinois at Urbana--Champaign, September 2014.
  4. Peter Dinges and Gul Agha. Solving complex path conditions through heuristic search on induced polytopes. In Proceedings of the 22nd ACM SIGSOFT Symposium on Foundations of Software Engineering. Hong Kong, November 16-21 2014. ACM.
  5. Peter Dinges, Minas Charalambides, and Gul Agha. Automated inference of atomic sets for safe concurrent execution. Technical Report, University of Illinois at Urbana--Champaign, April 2013.

See the list of all publications for more.